Geodatabase

Using Wildcards in Query Builder

Posted on March 30, 2010. Filed under: ESRI, Geodatabase |

This is a guest post from John Schaeffer of Juniper GIS.  John is the creator and instructor for our Working with Geodatabase and Linear Referencing e-learning course (self-paced and instructor led).

In this example, you can see that we have addresses for 100 East Cascade Avenue and 1001 East Cascade Avenue. If I used the expression above, I would get all the addresses in both blocks. But here is how to use the space holder wildcard to get only those meters in the 100 block. I start the expression above, but tell ArcGIS I only want addresses that start with 1 and have two more characters by putting two ?? after the 1.

Let’s try one more example. What if I want all the meters for the 100 block of East Cascade and West Cascade avenues? (If you ever drive through Sisters, Oregon these are the two blocks on the main street in the center of town.) I could just take the query above and change it to: [Address] LIKE ‘1?? * CASCADE AVE’

Understanding how to use these wildcards will make it a lot easier to query pieces of information out of any table. For more information on using the Query Builder, look for the Using the Query Builder PDF at http://www.junipergis.com/gis-links/presentations/.

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How to Use CAD Annotation in ArcPad

Posted on January 23, 2010. Filed under: ArcPad, Geodatabase, GPS |

This is a guest post by Michele Mattix of Geomattix, LLC.  Michele is the excellent author of several e-learning courses that we sell including: GPS Mapping with ArcPad, Integrating GPS Data with GIS, Introduction to GPS Technology, Adding Digital Photos to GIS, Working with Coordinate Systems in GIS and GPS, GPS Mapping with Trimble’s TerraSync and Pathfinder Office, and the GPS Bundle.

CAD users beware!  While ArcGIS supports the mapping of CAD data, ArcPad – ESRI’s field software – does not.  Though it is no problem to convert CAD data into the geodatabase format, the handling of CAD annotation can present challenges.  In this article, I will walk you through a problem one of my clients was having and the solution I came up with.

Background

My client has a Trimble GeoXH GPS unit on which they use ArcPad to collect field data.  I was contacted to help them clean up their GIS data.  In addition to maintaining GIS data, they also had several CAD files.  They wanted to consolidate all of the data into one efficient geodatabase.  I designed and created a new geodatabase for them and converted/imported the CAD data into it.  Among the CAD data were very detailed roads data that my client wanted to use as background data in ArcPad.  In CAD format, the roads were stored as lines and the road names were stored in a CAD annotation feature class.  When I converted the CAD data into the geodatabase format, two feature classes were created:  Roads – which contains the line data, and Roads_Annotation – a point feature class that contains the road names.  See the figure below.

When viewed in ArcMap, the raw CAD Polyline (roads) and Annotation layers appear as roads with labels, see below.  My client wanted to reproduce this same look with the geodatabase data.

Using the newly created geodatabase Roads_Annotation layer – which contains point data with road names as attributes — overwhelms the map with unnecessary points.  Also, the labels will not necessarily be oriented along the roads, as show below.

It would be nice to use the road names from the Roads_Annotation layer as labels in the Roads layer.  I could accomplish this by joining the two tables if only there were a key field.  Alas, there is not.

There is an Import CAD Annotation tool available in ArcToolbox that will convert a CAD annotation feature class into a geodatabase annotation feature class.  The annotation will look exactly as it does in the raw CAD data.  I used this tool to create the Annotation_rds feature class that works great in ArcMap.   ArcPad, however, does not support annotation feature classes.

The Problem

My client wanted both the roads and the road names to appear in ArcPad.  With no other options, I needed to find a way to use the Roads_Annotation point feature class to label the roads properly.

The Solution

Here’s how I made the Roads_Annotation point layer mimic the raw CAD annotation.  First, I symbolized the points so that they do not appear on the map.  I did this by choosing a basic ESRI point symbol that does not contain an outline, such as Circle 1, and then shrinking the size down to 7 points – any small size will work.  In the color palette selector, I chose “no color”, see below.

The effect is that the points do not appear even though the layer is turned on.

Next, I needed to make the labels orient with the roads.  Upon inspection, I discovered that the Roads_Annotation feature class contains an attribute field called TxtAngle.  The values range between 0 and 90 and represent the orientation angle of the original CAD annotation.

The default behavior for labels of point features in ArcMap is for the labels to be placed horizontally at a designated location around the point.  This works for point data, but not for my line data.  Fortunately, the default behavior can be changed.  From the labels tab in the layer properties, I chose the option to place the labels at an angle specified by a field in the table.  This allows ArcMap to position the labels as they were originally designed in CAD, see below.

Voila!  I now have labeled roads, see below.  The label font, color, and size can be adjusted to match the CAD annotation, see below.

Now when my client checks data out for use in ArcPad, the Roads and Roads_Annotation layers both can be checked out as reference data.  This is an easy way to provide a light-weight and detailed labeled roads layer in ArcPad.

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Upcoming Courses: Working with Geodatabases and ArcGIS Server JavaScript API

Posted on November 3, 2009. Filed under: ArcGIS Server, Dojo, ESRI, Geodatabase, GeoSpatial Training Services |

We have a couple opportunities for you to take part in our upcoming Internet based, instructor led courses.

Working with Geodatabases and Linear Referencing
December 7th – 18th
This course, taught by John Schaeffer of Juniper GIS, is designed to teach students all the fundamentals of the Geodatabase; creating and managing the geodatabase, using domains, subtypes and topology to better manage your data, using images with the geodatabase, and using specialized editing tools to correct and clean data, and creating routes.

Students will learn how to use Geodatabases by working through two realistic projects. The first project is preparing data for a burn plan on the Florida Panther Refuge; the second is working with stream data from the Wenatchee National Forest to analyze fish populations

Mastering the ArcGIS Server JavaScript API
January 11th – February 19th
Our Mastering the ArcGIS Server JavaScript API course is a series of 7 modules that will teach you how to build high performance, attractive Web mapping applications using the lightweight, browser based ArcGIS Server JavaScript API.

Modules

  • Introduction to JavaScript
  • Introduction to the ArcGIS Server JavaScript API
  • Application Debugging with FireFox and Firebug
  • Dojo + ArcGIS Server = Rapid Application Development
  • Advanced Dojo Concepts
  • Integrating ArcGIS Server with Google Maps
  • Capstone Project

Short on funds for GIS training?  You may wish to consider our “Save the Pig” subscriptions.

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Course Announcement: Working with Geodatabases and Linear Referencing

Posted on October 21, 2009. Filed under: ESRI, Geodatabase, GeoSpatial Training Services |

GeoSpatial Training Services would like to announce the availability of a new Internet based, instructor led course.  Working with Geodatabases and Linear Referencing, taught by John Schaeffer of Juniper GIS, is designed to teach students all the fundamentals of the Geodatabase; creating and managing the geodatabase, using domains, subtypes and topology to better manage your data, using images with the geodatabase, and using specialized editing tools to correct and clean data, and creating routes.

Students will learn how to use Geodatabases by working through two realistic projects. The first project is preparing data for a burn plan on the Florida Panther Refuge; the second is working with stream data from the Wenatchee National Forest to analyze fish populations.

Course Dates
December 7th – 18th, 2009.

Intended Audience
This course assumes you are comfortable with using ArcGIS 9.x for general GIS tasks and that you have had some editing experience. The course is written for ArcGIS 9.3.1, but will work with 9.2 and 9.3, though the dialog boxes might be slightly different.

Course Outline
The course is divided into three sections.

In the first section we will look at the basics of creating and managing a Geodatabase, and then converting data to the geodatabase format.

In the second section, we’ll show you how to use the geodatabase to validate or check you data for attribute and spatial errors, how to make data entry easier, and how to edit with Geodatabase Topology.

In the third section, we’ll work with Routes and Linear Referencing. Routes let you attach multiple data tables to linear features for analysis and mapping. The easiest way to think about routes is the milepost numbers you see as you drive down roads. Once you have established a route with “mileposts” you can then link this to multiple data sources. In the last module, we’ll show you a sample extension that will make it easier to manage and create reports on your geodatabase.

Modules

Section 1: Geodatabase Basics
Module 1: Geodatabase Concepts and Basics
Module 2: Converting Data to the Geodatabase Format
Module 3: Working with Rasters in the Personal Geodatabase

Section 2: Validating Data
Module 4: Validating Attributes – Subtypes, Domains, Relationship Classes
Module 5: Validating Features – Topology in the Geodatabase
Module 6: Editing Topology

Section 3: Linear Referencing
Module 7: Understanding Linear Referencing
Module 8: Editing and Using Routes for Analysis
Module 9: The Geodatabase Designer

GISCI Education Credit: 16 Hours

Registration
$500 if you register by October 31st.  $567 thereafter.

Add to Cart

You may also register by downloading the registration form and sending back to use via one of the methods listed on the registration document.

More Information
For more information please contact us at sales at geospatialtraining.com or 210-260-4992.

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